are diamonds with fluorescence valuable

Does Fluorescence Affect Pricing?

The real impact florescence has on the value of a diamond is still a subject of ongoing debate. Sometime back, fluorescence was the entire craze among buyers because many thought that it enhanced the diamond’s appearance; especially if the stone had a yellowish tint in its body color. 

Before the advent of grading reports, there was a general preference for diamonds with fluorescence and they used to sell at a premium compared to stones without fluorescence. At that time, these “blue-white” diamonds were marketed as alternatives to fancy blue diamonds and were in higher demand than non-fluorescing diamonds.

When the FTC banned the use of the term “blue-white” and grading reports started to include fluorescence ratings, people’s perceptions began changing. Buyers wanted to avoid diamonds that had anything ‘extra’; be it color, fluorescence or inclusions and this started to have an effect on the value of a diamond.

Today, diamond buyers tend to take on a negative approach and biased view towards fluorescence. Whatever positive effect fluorescence has on a diamond seems to be of little consequence since the buyers’ perception is to automatically shun away from diamonds with fluorescence. In a market driven world, this has led to lower prices and is something you can learn to take advantage of.

How Does Fluorescence Affect Diamond Value?

In the industry, diamonds with fluorescence are traded at a discount of 10-15%. For the purpose of doing a price comparison, we will examine how Brian Gavin’s signature Blue stack up against their signature Hearts And Arrows diamonds.

Note: both signature lines represent the pinnacle of precision cutting for optical performances. I am merely showing you the differences in prices caused by fluorescence here.

does fluorescence affect diamond value

Here, I want to bring up an interesting price observation I made in the trading networks. Because fluorescence can actually help improve visual color appearances, diamonds with near colorless grades like G – J may sell at slightly higher prices if they have favorable fluorescence properties.

Let’s take a look at another set of diamonds with similar specifications.

perceived value changes

Perceptions From the Diamond Industry

diamond ring in black light

Holding a Cushion Cut in Black Light

Historically, certain types of diamonds are given trade names based on where they are mined in large quantities.

• The term “premier” is used to describe light yellow diamonds with strong blue fluorescence properties because such stones often originate from South Africa’s Premier Mine.

• The term Jager refers to colorless diamonds with strong blue fluorescence because they are commonly excavated from South Africa’s Jagersfontein mine.

To sum up, fluorescence is not a big issue when shopping for diamonds if it is handled properly. In fact, fluorescence is more of a fun feature because of the cool effect it has on the stone. Still, the choices you make will depend on your personal tastes.

If you are looking for the highest performance diamonds that exhibit fluorescence, check out Brian Gavin’s signature Blues. These diamonds are hand selected for their beautiful blue tones in UV lighting and cut to optimal light performances.

If you are interested to find out more details, feel free to read our full review about them here

<< Prev Page

Related Articles

Sharing Is Caring ! Share on Facebook0Share on Google+0Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn0Share on Reddit0Share on StumbleUpon0

Leave A Comment