Telltale Signs of a Cracked Diamond

what to do if your diamond is cracked

Can Your Diamond Crack And Shatter?

If you had done some research prior to buying your diamond, you might have read about the things people do in order to protect their diamonds from chips, cracks and etc…

Now, you most likely ended up on this webpage because you were looking for information about “cracked diamonds” in the search engines.

Like most people, you probably freaked out a little when you banged your hand hard against the wall or dropped your diamond ring accidentally and want to find out whether you damaged your diamond.

Let me calm you down by saying it is relatively difficult for a diamond to become seriously damaged and what you might see as a problem may have nothing to do with cracks.

In this article, I will address some of the questions that readers had sent me and perform a closer examination of the “problems” that might be mistaken for a crack. I’ll also show you how a cracked diamond actually looks like in real life to quell irrational fears.

Daily Wear And Tear: Cracks Are Unlikely, While Blemishes Are

After purchasing their first diamond jewelry piece and wearing it for a few weeks, there are some people who get paranoid and start to worry whether they had damaged their diamond. Do you know the main reason behind this phenomenon?

Well, based on my interactions with readers and other shoppers, most people only start noticing details they never saw before because they had plenty of time to scrutinize their jewelry after owning it. The fact that the majority of people don’t inspect their jewelry in detail when making a purchase perplexes me deeply.

Instead, the questions only arise after they looked at their jewelry for a lengthy period of time and they start noticing stuff like girdle reflections or feather inclusions which were there all along. (By the way, don’t you think it’s a little too late to realize those issues now?)

Most of the Time, It’s Just a Cleanliness Issue

People often mistake a diamond to be cracked when they see a whitish looking line running through the diamond. Instead the culprit behind this is due to the mundane problem of having a dirty diamond. You see, throughout the course of the day, a diamond ring worn in your hand will inevitably come into contact with external agents (e.g. hand soap, water, your fingers etc…) and accumulate grim.

Initially, this layer of grim may result a layer of blemish that looks like a layer of clouds or oily stains. Overtime, some of this muck that is built up can become so thick begins to look like a thick white line. If this gunk was found on the pavilion of a mounted diamond, it can easily be mistaken as a sign of physical damage to the stone.

“Repairing the Cracks” – Cleaning the Diamond

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Also, as the diamond’s surface becomes dirtier, the stone will begin to look dull and lifeless. In turn, some of the inclusions that were previously masked by the stone’s brilliance and scintillation could now be seen easily. This could trick you into believing that new flaws had developed when they had been there all along.

By cleaning your diamond and removing a good deal of the grim, you will easily restore the stone to its initial condition. Most of the time, a soft brush and some detergent solution would be sufficient to get the job done.

If your ring setting has corners which are difficult to reach with a bristle brush, you might want to consider using an ultrasonic cleaning device or take it back to the jeweler for professional steam cleaning.

You Only Get What You Paid For: How It Could Actually be Broken

In truth, diamonds are rather hard to break. In order to really cause a crack in the stone, you have to apply the right amount of force at the correct angle along its cleavage plane to see results.

fracture propagated from crack in diamond

Feathers that extend to the surface of pavilion facets

There is also a direct relationship between the quality of the diamond and its “breakability”. A diamond with low clarity grade and a poor cut grade (crowns that are too shallow or extremely thin girdle thickness) will be more susceptible to damage when subjected to external forces.

From a mechanical engineering view of the crystalline structure, severely included diamonds have a weaker material integrity due to the presence of defects and foreign material. This is why you always want to inspect the diamond carefully before making any purchase commitments.

feather and huge crack in emerald

This I1 emerald cut has high risk of breakage due to the big feather inclusion (crack) it has.

Generally speaking, the saying “you get what you paid for” applies tenfold in the diamond industry. By paying more for quality, you indirectly buy yourself long-long years of durability and enjoyment.

Don’t make the same mistakes of buying blindly. James Allen offers you the ability to inspect and interact with loose diamonds under magnification. Now, you can examine every single detail of a diamond at the comfort of your home.

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2 Comments

  1. Hadfield-
    March 27, 2016 at 12:18 pm

    I paid a good price for my diamond ring 10 years ago Now there is a crack and the diamond as discoloured Have no idea what as happened Can you help me What can l do

  2. Paul Gian-
    March 27, 2016 at 12:36 pm

    Give the stone a good cleaning first to make sure it isn’t a blemish caused by dirt build up. If it is still there, take it to the jeweler you bought it from or an appraiser and ask for advice on how to proceed with whatever you want to do with it.

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